Pressure Cooker Cookbooks

If you already own my Instant Pot cookbook (THANKS!) and are looking for more recipes, I have a few favorite cookbooks to recommend for further reading:

dinner in an instant
Dinner in an Instant by Melissa Clark

Clark is the cooking guru at the New York Times, and her recipes are always reliable and delicious. She’s become an Instant Pot fan and has solid pressure cooking recipes.

 

hip pressure cooking
Hip Pressure Cooking by Laura D. A. Pazzaglia

Pazzaglia is a dominant force in modern electric pressure cooking, and her cook times chart is something to behold. Her recipes are reliable and well researched.


indian ip cookbook
Indian Instant Pot Cookbook
by Urvashi Pitre

Pitre is well known by the Instant Pot web community for her butter chicken recipe, and for good reason. The Instant Pot is great for cooking Indian food, and this cookbook can be your guide!


Instant Pot No Pressure Cookbook
The Instant Pot No-Pressure Cookbook
by ME

Had to include my new book. 😉 It comes out on May 1st and you can pre-order it now!

Advertisements
Pressure Cooker Cookbooks

Pressure Cooking Eggs

gudetama

I always make boiled eggs in the pressure cooker. It takes no time at all, they always turn out perfectly, and they peel easier than the traditional method. Here’s the basic method for pressure cooking eggs:*

  • Fill your pressure cooker with a little over a cup of water. Add the trivet or, even better, a steamer basket.
  • Add the eggs. You can add as many as you like, as long as they are stable (won’t fall over and break while cooking) and are not touching the sides of the pot.
  • Secure the lid and cook at LOW pressure. 4 minutes for soft boiled, 8 minutes for hard boiled.
  • Meanwhile, prepare an ice water bath.
  • Once the cook time is up, manually release the pressure and place the eggs in the ice water.
  • Once cool to the touch, store in the fridge or peel and eat.

*Cook times are for electric pressure cookers.

Pressure Cooking Eggs

Link Round-Up, 12.13.17

Santa Claus

Another year is nearly over, and my head is spinning. As nuts as 2017 has been, I’m very thankful to have written another book and look forward to its release in 2018! I’ve written a few other things too lately (please see below):

Happy and merry to all!

Link Round-Up, 12.13.17

Sweet Potatoes with Brown Sugar Topping in the Pressure Cooker

9781623156121_FC

Now that Thanksgiving is upon us, I thought I’d share a recipe from my last book for brown sugar sweet potatoes. I’m often struggling to figure out how to squeeze everything in the oven on the big day, so moving one dish to the cooker is a big help. The potatoes steam in the cooker before being sliced in two. Each half is topped with a brown sugar topping and quickly broiled right before serving. Lightly sweet with a little crunch on top, these sweet potatoes are a top-notch Thanksgiving side.

Sweet Potatoes with Brown Sugar Topping
from The Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook
Serves 6 to 8

1 cup water
6 medium sweet potatoes, pricked a few times with a fork
4 tablespoons butter, cubed
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pinch salt

  1. Add water to the pot and place a steamer basket or trivet on top. Arrange the sweet potatoes on the basket or trivet. Secure the lid.
  2. Cook at high pressure for 12 to 18 minutes (12 for small potatoes, 15 for medium, 18 for large).
  3. In a small bowl, mix together the remaining ingredients. Use your fingers to press the mixture together until a crumbly topping is formed.
  4. Once the cooking is complete, use a natural release for 10 minutes followed by a quick release.
  5. Preheat the oven to broil.
  6. Carefully transfer the potatoes to a large baking sheet. Slice each in half lengthwise and lay cut-side up. Sprinkle each half with 1 heaping tablespoon of topping and broil for 3 to 5 minutes, until lightly crispy.
Sweet Potatoes with Brown Sugar Topping in the Pressure Cooker

Update: Making Yogurt in the Instant Pot

yogurt

I’ve been making yogurt in my Instant Pot on the reg for years now. And while the method I wrote about a couple of years ago still works, I don’t tend to use it anymore. You see, I had a cheap jar break in the midst of making yogurt, and all it takes is your kitchen covered in hot milk and glass shards to make you rethink your methods.

Keep in mind that it was a cheap jar. I reused an apple sauce jar, and chances are it already had a small crack. If you use thick canning jars, you should be out of danger.

But! If you’d rather make your yogurt directly in the pot, here’s the basic method I use. It’s more convenient if you plan to strain your yogurt, Greek-style.

  1. Add milk to the pot. I don’t recommend making more than a gallon at a time, but any amount between 2 cups and a gallon is fine. Whole milk makes the creamiest yogurt, followed by 2% and then skim.
  2. Secure the lid and select Yogurt. Press the Adjust button until the display says “boil.”
  3. The Instant Pot is bringing the milk up to 180 degrees. You can safely open the lid during this process, and I like to whisk the milk every 5-10 minutes to keep it from scalding on the bottom of the pot.
  4. Once the program is finished and the display says “Yogt,” remove the lid and stir. Use a candy thermometer or instant thermometer to make sure that the milk has reached at least 180 degrees. If not, turn on the Saute function on low and stir until the milk comes to temperature.
  5. Remove the inner pot so that it cools faster. Let the milk cool until it reaches 105-110 degrees. To speed up the process, set the pot in a pan of cold water, stirring occasionally.
  6. Once cooled to 105-110 degrees, prepare the starter. Add 2 tablespoons of plain yogurt with active cultures per 1/2 gallon of milk to a small mixing bowl. Add about a cup of the warm milk and whisk. Add the mixture to the pot and stir. Return the pot to the cooker, drying off the outside if needed.
  7. Secure the lid and select Yogurt. The display should says “8:00.” Leave the milk to incubate for 8 hours.
  8. Once the program is complete, remove the pot and place it in the fridge for several hours until completely chilled. If you’d like Greek yogurt, you can now strain it in the fridge for 30 minutes to 4 hours, depending on how thick you like your yogurt.
  9. Store the yogurt in containers in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.
Update: Making Yogurt in the Instant Pot

No Pressure photoshoot

As the release date for my latest cookbook slowly approaches, I’d like to share a few behind-the-scenes photos from the photoshoot. Note that these are just from my phone, and that the lovely Staci Valentine‘s photos are MUCH better (stunning, really). Can’t wait to share the book with you all in May!

IMG_6881

IMG_6868

IMG_6877

No Pressure photoshoot