Instant Pot Talk + Rice Pudding Recipe

IMG-2103

Last month I spoke to a fun group at the Arcadia Public Library about the Care and Feeding of Your Instant Pot. We covered buying an Instant Pot (and if you should buy one at all), different models, set-up, tips and tricks, cleaning and maintenance, and more. I also demo’ed a rice pudding recipe which is available below!

Instant Pot Rice Pudding
Serves 6

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes, plus cooling

1 cup short-grain white rice, rinsed well and drained
5 cups whole milk
2/3 cup sugar
1 pinch salt
2 large eggs beaten, at room temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  1. Combine the rice, milk, sugar, and salt in your Instant Pot. Whisk together and secure the lid.
  2. Cook at high pressure for 10 minutes and use a natural release.
  3. Whisk the cooked rice and milk mixture well. Temper the eggs by slowly adding 1 cup of the hot milky rice to the eggs while whisking constantly. Add that mixture to the Instant Pot slowly, whisking the whole time.
  4. Turn on the Sauté function. Whisk until the mixture is simmering and starting to thicken up. Turn off the Sauté function.
  5. Add the vanilla and mix well.
  6. Allow the rice pudding to cool. It will thicken greatly as it sits. Serve warm or cold.

Flavor ideas (add after cooling)

  • Chocolate-covered cherry: mini semi-sweet chocolate chips and chopped fresh cherries or dried cherries
  • Mango-lime: Diced ripe mango tossed in the juice and zest of 1-2 fresh limes
  • Cinnamon roll: 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • Peach-almond: Fresh diced peaches, slivered almonds on top
Advertisements
Instant Pot Talk + Rice Pudding Recipe

Cleaning Your Instant Pot

IMG-8830

Other than cleaning the inner pot, it’s hard to know what else you need to be doing to keep your Instant Pot squeaky clean and working properly. For an exhaustive tutorial, read over this article from The Kitchn. Here are my quick tips:

Every time you use your IP:

  • Clean the inner pot in the sink or dishwasher. If the pot becomes cloudy, use vinegar to clean. Don’t use steel wool.
  • Use a small brush or thin, damp sponge to clean the crevice at the top of the unit. It often ends up with little spills or bits of dried food.
  • Wipe the inside of the lid with a damp cloth.
  • Wipe the outside of the unit as needed with a damp cloth.

Every few times you use your IP:

  • Remove the silicone ring and wash in the sink or dishwasher. If it is smelly, soak it in vinegar before cleaning again.
  • Remove the plastic piece snapped on the back that catches condensation and over-fill and clean.

Everyone once and a while:

  • Remove the gadgets in the lid and clean. See steps 6-8 for details.
Cleaning Your Instant Pot

Instant Pot updates

IMG_8043

Lots going on in the Instant Pot universe! I received a copy of the German edition of my first book (above), which is totally surreal. My next book comes out in a little over a month, and I’m working on a couple of videos (stay tuned)! Meanwhile, my book randomly made an appearance in a Bill Maher rant. Wowee.

27751627_2016272248413636_1187909027961580373_n

Below are some recent Instant Pot-related links I’ve enjoyed lately. I hope you enjoy them too!

 

Instant Pot updates

Pressure Cooking Eggs

gudetama

I always make boiled eggs in the pressure cooker. It takes no time at all, they always turn out perfectly, and they peel easier than the traditional method. Here’s the basic method for pressure cooking eggs:*

  • Fill your pressure cooker with a little over a cup of water. Add the trivet or, even better, a steamer basket.
  • Add the eggs. You can add as many as you like, as long as they are stable (won’t fall over and break while cooking) and are not touching the sides of the pot.
  • Secure the lid and cook at LOW pressure. 4 minutes for soft boiled, 8 minutes for hard boiled.
  • Meanwhile, prepare an ice water bath.
  • Once the cook time is up, manually release the pressure and place the eggs in the ice water.
  • Once cool to the touch, store in the fridge or peel and eat.

*Cook times are for electric pressure cookers.

Pressure Cooking Eggs

Instant Pot Ultra Thoughts

unnamed

I recently received the newest Instant Pot model, the Ultra, thanks to the kind people at Instant Pot HQ. Note that I did not receive it in exchange for a review or any other coverage, I just thought I’d share my thoughts about the Ultra for those that are considering upgrading or are comparing versus an older model. So here we go!

Steam release — There are two major upgrades to the Ultra, and one of them is the steam release. Instead of a single steam valve that you turn to seal or release, the Ultra has a separate button. This is great for two reasons:

  1. You don’t have to touch where the steam is releasing, making it a little safer and less likely to scald
  2. It automatically resets to sealing when you open the lid. Even though I’ve used the IP a bazillion times, I still forget to close the valve sometimes on the old model. The Ultra makes this impossible by closing the vent automatically.

Note that when you press down the button for a quick release, it takes longer to release the pressure than older models. You can force it to release steam quicker by pressure down the button harder, but then you’ll have to stand there the whole time pressing the button.

Cooking Options — The Ultra has even more automated cooking settings, which is all well and good, but I rarely use any of them other than Pressure, Sauté, and Yogurt. But! With the Ultra, you can make some over-arching settings to the whole machine, as well as on a per-use basis. I’m a big fan of these options:

  1. You can turn the sound off. You may not want to turn the sound off, but with the amount of recipes I make in my IP and the amount of beeps it makes (especially the Ultra), sometimes I just want some peace and quiet. Note that it won’t beep at all, even when food is done cooking, so this is not for everyone/all the time.
  2. You can disable the Keep Warm function. I pretty much never use this function and the vast majority of the time I want it turned off, so as to not inhibit the release of pressure or scald delicate items on the bottom of the pot. Unfortunately you can’t turn off the function universally, but you can turn it off beforehand each time you cook something.

Backlit Display and Knob — The most obvious differences are the backlit display (which was already available on the Duo Plus) and a knob that you turn and press to make all selections. The knob takes a little getting used to, but for no specific reason I like it. I think with all of the options on this version of the IP, you need a knob instead of a million buttons to push.

Another Thing I’ve Noticed — In my experience thus far, pressure takes a lot longer to release with the Ultra than the older models. Just keep this in mind when budgeting time for a recipe. I honestly sometimes end up slowly releasing the pressure when I just can’t wait any longer.

All-in-all, the older models still work great, and it’s up to you if the jump in price is worth it. As someone who uses an Instant Pot all the time to test recipes, I’ve very much appreciated the revised steam release and the extra adjustables. But I also still use my old IP all the time. Long live pressure cooking, regardless of what cooker you choose!

Instant Pot Ultra Thoughts

Report Card

zBreV9o

It’s been a while since I’ve posted, but it’s for good reason, I swear! I am (drum roll please) writing a new cookbook! It’s another electric pressure cooker cookbook, but with more fun, interesting recipes for those ready to take the next step in their pressure cooker relationship. It’ll have lots of fun flavors and dishes and will incorporate the pressure cooker as part of your functioning, 21st century kitchen.

So in the meanwhile I’ll try to put up a blog post or two, but you’ll be hearing much more from me after the summer. It’s summer anyway, you should be sitting by a pool and reading a thriller-romance, not reading my dumb blog.

Keep an eye out for the cookbook via St. Martin’s Press, due out next spring!

Report Card

Pressure Cooker Brown Rice Risotto

640px-Brown_rice

One of the most popular dishes to make in a pressure cooker is risotto. Instead of standing over a hot pot and stirring stirring stirring, the rice cooks away all on its own and emerges creamy and flavorful. It’s wonderful.

There are a couple of risotto recipes in my cookbook, but the variations are endless. I recently made a version using brown rice! It was super tasty and healthier than the typical version. You’ll just need a few more minutes of cooking time.

Note that this recipe is written for an electric pressure cooker, but will work with a stove top version as well.

Brown Rice Risotto
Serves 2-3 (you can easily double this recipe)

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/4 cup dry white wine or 3 tablespoons dry vermouth
1 cup short-grain brown rice
2 cups good-quality chicken or vegetable stock
Salt
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for serving
Mix-ins (see below)

Heat your pressure cooker using the Sauté function. Once hot, add the oil followed by the onion. Sauté for 3 minutes or until the onions are becoming translucent. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add white wine or vermouth and cook, scraping the bottom, until most of the liquid is absorbed.

Turn off the Sauté function and add the rice, stock, and a healthy pinch of salt. Secure the lid and cook for 25 minutes at high pressure and use a natural release.

While the rice is cooking, prepare your mix-ins. I have some ideas for you below.

Once the pressure has been released, remove the lid and add the butter and Parmesan. Stir vigorously for a few minutes until the rice is creamy. Add your mix-ins and stir. Serve topped with a little more Parmesan and perhaps a chopped fresh herb.

Mix-ins (mix and match!)

  • 1-2 links of high-quality sausage, cooked through and broken up or sliced
  • Sautéd chopped fresh spinach
  • Sautéd mushrooms with thyme
  • Roasted butternut squash and fresh sage
  • Roasted or sautéd asparagus and lemon
  • Broiled shrimp
  • Fresh, lightly cooked green peas
Pressure Cooker Brown Rice Risotto